Buying or selling a home?

Buying or selling a property is a complex legal process and is probably the biggest financial transaction you’ll be involved in. It’s important to find out as much as possible about the process before you begin.

Free guides to buying or selling a home 

These guides have information about the key things to know about the home buying and selling processes including the importance of legal advice, what to expect from the real estate agent and the different methods of buying or selling. 

D​ownload Your guide to selling a home​ (.pdf 975KB)

Download the Home Buyers' Guide (.pdf 253KB) 

Information for buyers

On a mobile device? Visit our mobile friendly home buyers' page: buyingahome.reaa.govt.nz​

4 important things to do before buying a property:

  1. Do your own research about the property
  2. Get legal and professional advice
  3. Understand the sale process and method of sale
  4. Read the sale and purchase agreement and understand what it means for you


Information for sellers
On a mobile device? Visit our mobile friendly home sellers' page: sellingahome.reaa.govt.nz​​

4 important things to do before selling a property:

  1. Get legal advice
  2. Sign up with a real estate salesperson
  3. Understand the sale process and method of sale
  4. Read the sale and purchase agreement and understand what it means for you

Information for both buyers and sellers

The sale and purchase agreement

The sale and purchase agreement is legally binding, so it’s important to read it carefully
and get legal advice before you sign. You can negotiate the terms and conditions of an
agreement, but once you sign it, there’s no going back.​



The method of sale

There are several methods of buying and selling property – for example, tender or
auction. It’s important to understand the process being used for the property you are buying or selling. Practices can vary between agencies, so make sure you confirm details with them.


Property tax

There may be tax implications if you buy and sell a property within two years. You can talk to your lawyer about any tax implications and you can find out more at the IRD website​. ​

Glossary